Austin Turning Point Reviews, Cost, Complaints

Austin Turning Point

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Austin TexasThe Basics

Abe Hernandez, who has been in recovery for over 11 years, founded Austin Turning Point in 2007. Located in Austin, Texas this group of sober living homes provides a safe haven for recovering male alcoholics and addicts. Hernandez, who serves as Austin Turning Point’s Executive Director, is highly active in the city’s recovery community. Additionally, he works closely with his clients in hopes that their sober living experience will be a positive turning point in their lives.

Accommodations and Amenities

Austin Turning Point operates three centrally located houses, including two for men who have over 30 days of sobriety, and one newcomer residence for clients who have under 30 days. Austin Turning Point has a 28-bed capacity in its three homes. Accommodations vary per residence, but typically clients are housed in fully furnished double-occupancy or triple-occupancy rooms, which include twin beds, or a twin and bunk bed, shared closet space, dressers and large windows providing ample sunlight. Each room has a flat screen Cable TV.

Clients are responsible for their own groceries, and prepare meals in fully equipped kitchens. After midnight, the kitchen, including the microwave oven, are off limits. Hungry clients are advised to eat cereal, fruit or a sandwich. Amenities include Cable TV, Wi-Fi, laundry, detergent, paper products, coffee, job resume building tools and a house computer with printer. The houses each include a live-in resident manager.

Rules and Regulations

Austin Turning Point requires a 90-day minimum length of stay. Two houses require that clients have a minimum of 30-days of abstinence, while the Hartford B residence welcomes newcomers with less than 30 days, who have undergone detox. All clients must pass a drug test to be admitted.

Requirements include attending a minimum of four weekly 12-step meetings, finding a sponsor within 14 days and actively working the steps. Participation at the Sunday house meeting is mandatory. During that time, clients must show proof of AA/NA/CA meeting attendance.

During the first two weeks, all residents must be out of the house from 10 am to 2 pm Mondays through Fridays searching for work, volunteer opportunities or pursuing their academic education. By the end of this time frame, clients must have secured a weekly 20-hour minimum schedule comprised of work, school or community service. Those caught lurking in the houses during the first two weeks are subject to a seven-day 9 pm curfew and two hours of community service. Additionally, those who have not found a job or volunteer opportunity or enrolled in school must attend five weekly noon 12-step meetings, in addition to the other four required meetings.

During the first 30 days, the curfew is 10 pm seven days a week, except for the Hartford B house, which has a nine pm curfew time. After 30 days, the curfew is midnight seven days a week, for all clients in good standing. Clients must perform household chores, maintain respectful noise levels and be courteous to their housemates. Active alcoholics or addicts are not allowed on the premises.

At Austin Turning Point, clients who do not adhere to rules and regulations are subject to penalties. The first infringement guarantees two hours of community service, while the second violation insures that the client receives an action correction letter.

Other no-no’s include using the TV between the hours of 11 pm and 7 am from Sundays to Thursdays, eating meals in bedrooms or living rooms, smoking inside the houses, having visitors in undesignated areas, stealing (including food) from housemates, possessing weapons and surfing porn or other offensive web sites on the Internet.  At Austin Turning Point, clients undergo random drug testing. Eviction is immediate for residents who test positive.

Extras

Clients have opportunities to participate in on-site step studies and a relapse prevention program. The relapse prevention program is comprised of weekly group therapy, which is conducted by a visiting Master’s-level social worker. Group topics include relapse prevention, life skills and goal setting.

In Summary

With Hernandez at the helm, Austin Turning Point enjoys a solid reputation in the Austin recovery community. While the requirements might seem intensive for some, those seeking an opportunity to learn self-discipline will find this to be good fit. With its on-site therapeutic services and an emphasis on the 12 steps, men who are serious about recovery will find a home at Austin Turning Point.

Austin Turning Point
3300 Kim Ln
Austin, TX 78705

Austin Turning Point Cost: $700 (30 days, not including a $200 security deposit). Reach Austin Turning Point by phone at (512) 921-8182 or by email. Find Austin Turning Point at Google+

Do you have a complaint or review of Austin Turning Point to add? Use the comments area below to add your Austin Turning Point review.

Photo courtesy of GoogleMaps

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2 Comments

  1. I roomed with Wyatt. He was a thief,midget and a liar. ATP saved my life! They Rock! Wyatt go back to treatment….

  2. I stayed at Abe Hernandez’s A.T.P “recovery” homes in 2013 after graduating from Origins treatment in south padre. After getting into a cab with a roommate, I got arrested for theft of service because he ran off not telling me that he had no money for the fair. I stayed in jail from Friday night to Monday afternoon only to come back and find that Abe had sold my bed out from under me leaving me with nowhere to go due to me migrating from the west coast to restart. After asking to sleep on the couch for one night so I could have time to mail my belongings home so I might be able to try to make my way home travelling lightly, he insisted on me going on the greyhound that he paid for despite my protest. He gave me his word that he would mail (cash on delivery) my belongings aka EVERYTHING I OWNED to me the fallowing day, But held them ransom from a struggling addict that was just kicked out of there only home halfway across the country by him. Abe is supposed to be a role model for newly recovering addicts looking for guidance and a figure of AA/NA, But from what I have seen of him he is most certainly not. His “homes” where sub standard, over priced, & crowded. In my experience all of the “non-actions” where lazy and money hungry. Passing judgement and trying to guilt, manipulative newly sober people into free labor while taking what little pocket change available off the top. This was my experience.

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