Taylor Made Retreat Reviews, Cost, Complaints

Taylor Made Retreat

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The Basics

Taylor Made Retreat is a brand-new recovery facility just outside of downtown Portland, Oregon. It specializes in the care of men struggling with alcohol and substance use disorder. Through an immersion in the 12-step recovery method, the facility seeks to heal residents and guide them down a healthier, more stable spiritual path. Psychotherapy, medical care and clinical treatment methods are not components of the programming. All Taylor Made staff and volunteers are veterans of the 12-step process.

Accommodations and Amenities

Taylor Made is situated in a historic and beautiful 6,500 square foot mansion built in the 1930s by former pro boxer and bootlegger. Known locally as “The Walker Road Castle,” the estate sits on four acres of beautiful, lush land with natural springs, fountains and garden paths. There are six spacious bedrooms equipped with basic furnishings and bunk beds. The residence can accommodate up to 20 young men.

Residents enjoy both the surrounding nature and the many provided amenities, including an outdoor pool, an atrium, several patios, common areas, stained glass windows and wood-paneled rooms. The facility offers a private gym and workout rooms for yoga and pilates. Residents are also taken on frequent trips in a tour bus.

Rules and Regulations

Taylor Made provides a safe and supportive environment for men that have already accepted their issues with alcohol and substance use. In lieu of an intake assessment, the facility onboards residents through an extensive acclimation process that fully explains the 12-step model. While the length of stay varies depending on the specific needs of the individual, the facility sets a minimum stay at 30 days.  There is a 90-day extended program available as well as a brief 10-day plan for clients that have relapsed.

Clients are kept busy throughout their stay with plenty of activities and structured free time. Residents engage in daily meditation, spiritual and Big Book study groups, educational lectures and in-house meetings, as well as 12-step groups. In addition, the facility hosts groups dedicated to specific steps of the process, such as a “Rest and Renewal Program” specifically geared for individuals working on the fourth and fifth steps.

Residents are asked to bring basic clothing and supplies for studying. The facility does permit prescription medications in addition to cigarettes and vaping. While clients cannot buy more cigarettes during their stay, they can receive them in the mail. Residents are also permitted iPods and music players but nothing with video capabilities like laptops or gaming systems. As the experience is a complete immersion, clients are not allowed distracting pleasure reading but can bring spiritual books. Visitors are allowed on Sundays between noon and 5 pm.

In Summary

Taylor Made Retreat offers a peaceful environment that simultaneously provides a strong support system and a private atmosphere ideal for reflection. While Taylor Made does not offer clinical or therapeutic programming, the facility immerses residents in the 12-step model. For clients seeking a new, unique adventure and a spiritual path, Taylor Made is a great option.

Taylor Made Retreat
10930 SW Walker Rd
Portland, OR 97005

Taylor Made Retreat Cost: $4,900 (first 30 days); $4,100 (each additional month). Taylor Made Retreat by phone at (503) 847-9823 or by email at [email protected]. Find Taylor Made Retreat on Facebook 

Do you have a complaint or review of Taylor Made Retreat to add? Use the comments area below to add your Taylor Made Retreat review.

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1 Comment

  1. Paul Williamson on

    I support your goals entirely. Your retreat today (12/14) came as a bit of a surprise to most of us in the neighborhood. When shuttle cars began showing up in the AM, the light began to dawn that something was going on close by. It would have been nice to have informed the drivers of the cars who were attending not to park in front of folks’ driveways, mailboxes, or walkways. It seems a reasonable request. I suggested to one of the volunteers that perhaps the owners of cars that are blocking walkways, etc. might be asked to move their vehicles. The response I got was rude: “It’s public parking, so people can park there if they wish. I apologize for whoever parked blocking a walkway, but ……..” Perhaps the volunteers could more closely supervise where folks parked so as not to cause residents of this community to be discomfited by their thoughtlessness.

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