Talbert House Reviews, Cost, Complaints

Talbert House

1
Share.

Talbert House dreamstimeThe Basics

Talbert House offers a range of social services to men and women in the greater Cincinnati and northern Kentucky areas. The organization started out in 1965 as just a house, for ex-offenders who wanted to reintegrate into the community. Today, its 850 staff members work in counseling centers, halfway houses and an adolescent residential treatment facility, offering mental health and substance abuse treatment programs, community corrections programs and welfare-to-work programs. Talbert House’s residential and outpatient substance abuse treatment programs are located in five counties in Ohio: Brown, Butler, Clinton, Hamilton, and Warren.

Accommodations and Food

Talbert House offers residential treatment for court-ordered adults and self-referred youth up to 21 years old. The halfway houses for adults, all in southwest Ohio, are called Cornerstone, Pathways, Serenity Hall, Spring Grove, and Turtle Creek Center. Pathways is the only house specifically for women, with some beds reserved for clients with small children. Pathways, Cornerstone, and Spring Grove are all in Cincinnati; Turtle Creek Center is north of the city on a quiet country road; and Serenity Hall, too, is north of the city, in the town of Hamilton. In all of the houses, clients share bedrooms, bathrooms and chores, help to prepare meals and do their own laundry.

Separate housing is offered for youth with substance abuse and behavioral issues. Male and female clients are housed in separate wings of a former hospital building. The program’s maximum capacity is 30 clients—an even split between males and females. Clients share bedrooms and bathrooms and meals are taken together in the cafeteria, buffet-style, three times a day.

Treatment and Staff

True to its original mission, Talbert House still provides halfway housing to ex-offenders who need treatment for addiction and, potentially, behavior modification. The length of stay in this program varies depending on the client, but is typically 90 days. The goal is to prepare clients for reintegration into their communities.

Halfway house clients are assigned to a case manager who helps them to make a treatment plan and oversees their progress. The core of treatment is education around addiction and group work around behavior modification and underlying trauma. Therapists use CBT as the primary mode of therapy in individual and group settings. Dual diagnosis support is available in all of Talbert House’s programs. Introduction to the 12 steps and ongoing participation in the 12-step community is also encouraged.

Clients are expected to seek work while in treatment, if they do not already have a job. Those with children are supported with childcare services while they are job searching and in therapy. Talbert House does not offer detox or inpatient for self-referred adults.

Outpatient group therapy is often offered as post-residential support, though it is possible to start treatment at the outpatient level as well. This level of care is for clients who can function in real-world settings and don’t need 24-hour supervision, but who can use the extra support of group therapy and peer encouragement to maintain their recovery. Individual therapy is also available. A judge makes the referral for these clients and probation officers make the arrangements.  There is a $25 registration fee, and the rest of the cost is on a sliding scale. A client’s time in outpatient care varies from week to week. The duration may be short-term (as little as 30 days) or long-term (a year), depending on need.

Residential treatment is also provided for youth struggling with behavioral and substance abuse problems. Unlike the halfway housing for adults, however, these clients can be self-referred. Girls and boy are treated separately; programs are designed to deal with issues specific to each sex. Clients participate in self-help recovery groups like AA and NA. Among themselves, clients have group therapy on topics like grief, abuse, victimization, relapse prevention and family functioning. There are facilitated groups, too, on life skills: for example, how to communicate in interpersonal relationships, how to address one’s basic needs, and how to protect oneself from negative influences. Clients in this program can stay for as little as 30 days, but most stay an average of four months. Both adolescent programs are staffed with therapists as well as psychiatrists and nurse practitioners.

Adolescent clients also have the option of outpatient treatment services. For young adults struggling with other issues and behaviors, like trauma and fire-setting, dual diagnosis support is available.

Extras

Talbert House offers extensive services to incarcerated men and women. Groups are offered on anger management, chemical dependency, life skills and re-entry planning.

For residents of Hamilton County, a Mental Health Court Day Reporting Program serves as an alternative to incarceration, at absolutely no cost. Clients work with a treatment team and benefit from CBT, job search assistance and life skills and parenting classes.

In the summer, Talbert House also staffs a child and adolescent day camp that includes regular summer camp recreation as well as treatment groups for behavioral issues.

In Summary

Talbert House’s motto is, “Building a stronger community…one life at a time.” According to their stats, they serve 31,000 people a year and they offer some kind of recovery program for almost everyone. A caveat for the adolescent treatment program may be the lack of school services; other residential programs often build their treatment schedules around academics.

Talbert House
2600 Victory Pkwy
Cincinnati, OH 45206

Talbert House Cost: $5,500 (30 days). Reach Talbert House by phone at (513) 751-7747 or by email. Find Talbert House on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn 

Do you have a complaint or review of Talbert House to add? Use the comments area below to add your Talbert House review.

Share.

1 Comment

  1. Tolbert house holds federal inmates from home confinement in order to make more money from the government until there’s enough people to continually fill each Bed, totally unacceptable that these companies take advantage of the system with no regard to MORALES it’s all about money

Leave A Reply

About Author

The largest and most trusted rehab review site in the world.