Project Transition Reviews, Cost, Complaints

Project Transition

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The Basics

In 1982, psychiatrist Loren Crabtree was unable to find community housing for a client recently discharged from a mental hospital. After discovering there was a one-year waiting list for housing, he took it upon himself to find the man an apartment and a roommate. This experience inspired him to create Project Transition later that year. Located north of Philadelphia, in Chalfont, Pennsylvania, Project Transition provides long-term residential treatment for adults needing mental health care, as well as for clients with co-occurring disorders.

Accommodations and Food

With a 30-bed capacity, Project Transition houses clients in 10 fully furnished apartments that are within walking distance of the main treatment facility. Henry on the Park, a complex in the Philadelphia area, is the main residence. Gender-specific apartments are shared between three residents, with two of them typically sharing a room, while the third has a private sleeping area. The clients have all the comforts of home and amenities such as cell phones are allowed. Wi-Fi and cable TV are provided.

As part of their life skills training, residents are required to purchase their own groceries and cook their own meals.

Treatment and Staff

A client must have substance abuse issues and a co-occurring disorder to be eligible for this program. Detox is not provided, but referrals can be made if necessary. Upon admittance, clients receive a complete assessment and individualized treatment plans from a CADC. Residents work closely with their assigned case managers and treatment length is typically between 12 and 18 months.

With an emphasis on evidence-based modalities, specifically DBT, treatment includes daily group sessions and individual therapy with a CADC at least once per week. Clients attend between three and five weekly 12-step meetings off site. Transportation is provided.

Residents participate in a daily 9:30 am community meeting and attend between five and six group sessions per day. Group topics include relapse prevention, meditation, interpersonal skills and substance abuse awareness. Because this is a program specifically for those with co-occurring disorders, much of the focus is on dual diagnosis support, including medication management, social skills and trauma-informed treatments like EMDR.

Out-of-pocket cost for treatment is $9,216 for 30 days. There is a three- to five-week processing period for program applications. Upon admittance, Project Transition requires a non-refundable fee of $18,432 that covers the initial two-month stay. The staff includes psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric rehabilitation counselors, program managers and CADCs.

Extras

Residents have access and a complimentary membership to a local gym. On weekends, they are transported to shopping mall outings, the movies or the beach (in the summer).

A family program includes individual progress meetings, multi-family support groups and educational seminars designed to educate loved ones about co-occurring disorders and substance abuse.

In Summary

For those requiring comprehensive mental health care along with treatment for substance abuse, this is a great alternative to long-term institutionalization. Project Transition encourages independence and peer support, which can be particularly effective in helping clients recover from the co-occurring disorders that often walk hand in hand with chemical dependency.

Project Transition
One Highland Dr
Chalfont, PA 18914

Project Transition Cost: $9,216 (30 days). Reach Project Transition by phone at (215) 997-9959 or by email. Find Project Transition at Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube

Do you have a complaint or review of Project Transition to add? Use the comments area below to add your Project Transition review.

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1 Comment

  1. Project Transition was great when I first got there and about a year and a half after. Then they started changing everything! They fired great staff, changed the programming, and all the rules. If you were sick they harassed you to get out of bed. One time I was up all night getting sick and they banged on my bedroom door telling me I had to come to groups. They showed favoritism to certain clients and treated others like crap. I feel I left at exactly the right time! I found out after I left all the staff was gone including the therapist that had been there for 15 years. I definitely would not recommend going to PT if you have a choice!

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