McShin Foundation Reviews, Cost, Complaints

McShin Foundation

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Richmond Virginia

The Basics

Founded in 2004 in Richmond, Virginia, McShin Foundation is a non-profit Recovery Community Organization, providing an alternative to traditional inpatient and outpatient substance abuse and addiction treatment. The McShin Foundation is deeply rooted in the 12 steps and adheres to the belief that one alcoholic and addict helping another is vital to long-term sobriety.

Accommodations and Food

McShin Foundation is comprised of eight recovery houses, including two gender-specific homes where newly arrived clients reside for the first 30 days. There is a 75-bed capacity, including the male-only house, which has 12 men, and the female-only house, which holds eight women. Accommodations vary, but typically clients share double or triple-occupancy rooms.

During the first 30 days, food is included in the cost and residents are taken grocery shopping once a week. They cook their own meals, thus learning life skills. Amenities include laundry facilities, four computers with Internet, ample recovery literature and visual media, and onsite staff.

Treatment and Staff

During the first 30 days, clients requiring detox are allowed to stay, but referred to a doctor and a psychiatrist. Medication-assisted treatment, including methadone and Suboxone, are permitted for detox purposes only but are not allowed for maintenance. The McShin Model, which is a social model recovery program and employs experiential therapy, is used.

The average length of stay is 90 days, but some clients stay longer. The program includes peer recovery support services, recovery coaching, educational classes, and mandatory attendance at 14 weekly 12-step meetings. Individual therapy is available, per client’s needs. Residents must find a temporary sponsor within seven days, and secure a permanent sponsor within 30 days. Clients must work on their steps, and provide written proof.

Other requirements include attendance at a weekly fellowship dinner, participation in meditation groups, performance of household chores and for those seeking a more faith-based approach, attendance at Church services. During the first 30 days, clients must be chaperoned by their sponsor or a person of the same gender who has been clean and sober for a minimum of 30 days. The curfew is 10 pm seven days a week.

Random drug and alcohol screening is conducted. At McShin Foundation, a zero tolerance policy is enforced. Those who have relapsed are immediately evicted from the premises. Other behaviors that warrant instant expulsion include excessive loudness, theft, violence and curfew violation.

Staff of 13 includes peer leaders, and certified peer recovery coaches. The initial 30-day cost is $5,800, and for clients requiring detox, the 30-day cost is $9,800. After that time, the 30-day cost is $540, not including a $435 move in fee.

Extras

McShin Foundation provides intervention services on a walk-in basis for those who wish to help loved ones with addiction issues.

In Summary

There’s a lot going on at McShin, which is a wonderful option for clients seeking an alternative to traditional residential treatment. Accountability is emphasized here, and clients should be open to positive criticism from peers and recovery coaches. For clients seeking comprehensive peer-based support, plus a chance to dig into their Big Books, McShin Foundation might be just what the doctor ordered.

McShin Foundation
2300 Dumbarton Rd
Richmond, VA 23228

McShin Foundation Cost: $5,800-$9,800 (30 days). Reach McShin Foundation by phone at (804) 249-1845 or by email. Find McShin Foundation at Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn

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1 Comment

  1. This organization is a money grab and not a viable source for addiction treatment. Almost 50% of their residential participants either relapsed, are in jail, or DIED according to their 2016-2017 annual report. They do not employ any evidence-based practice, kick participants out immediately if they relapse, claim to support many pathways to recovery but require twelve step and faith-based meetings, do not believe in medical maintenance or harm-reduction therapies, do not inform family members or give refunds if participants leave, exploit residents for free labor during their various fundraisers (they made over $500,000 last year) and allow 13-steppers to prey on newly-detoxed clients. It should be shut down.

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