Fairfax Hospital Reviews, Cost, Complaints

Fairfax Hospital

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Fairfax HospitalThe Basics

In the early 1930s, a husband and wife pair of psychiatric aides opened Fairfax Hospital, naming it for a street in the neighborhood. Ownership of the hospital has changed hands several times since then, but in 85 years Fairfax Hospital has become the largest private inpatient psychiatric hospital in Washington State. For men and women struggling with chemical dependency and co-occurring mental health issues like depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and post-traumatic stress, Fairfax Hospital offers short-term acute care, including detox. The goal of this program is to stabilize the symptoms of mental illness in order to successfully address the client’s chemical dependency.

Accommodations and Food

Some 20 years after its inception, Fairfax Hospital moved from Seattle to a bigger facility across Lake Washington. This might sound like a long way, but the Hospital is really only a 30-minute drive on the 405 Highway from downtown Seattle. Fairfax Hospital is located in suburban Kirkland, surrounded by houses, office buildings and

Clients in the co-occurring disorder program live in a mixed gender unit with 20 to 30 people. No private rooms are available, but by luck of the draw, a client might have a room to themselves for a night or so, but typically clients have one to two roommates who all share a bathroom. It’s suggested that clients bring a week’s worth of clothes because the duration of treatment is so short, laundering services aren’t available.

Meals are served buffet-style in the cafeteria three times a day. Clients in detox who may be unable to go to the cafeteria for health reasons are served meals in their unit. Healthy snacks are provided during the day. Clients are allowed to bring up to $25 in cash to use at the vending machines.

Treatment and Staff

The program lasts only seven days but Fairfax Hospital packs a lot into a week. Detox can last anywhere from one to seven days, depending on the client and the history of abuse; services are available for alcohol, benzodiazepines (like Valium, Xanax, Ativan and Klonopin) and opioids (heroin, Oxycodone and OxyContin). When necessary, clients are given oral medications to manage the discomfort of withdrawal.

Within the first 24 hours, clients meet with a psychiatrist to determine their mental state and what medications might be appropriate for treating any presenting conditions. As clients start to stabilize, they begin to participate in the treatment phase of the program. While the program is group-oriented, clients do see a psychiatrist and a therapist for individual therapy several times during their week.

Clients begin and end the day with a community meeting of their peers. Community is about checking in and getting grounded, as opposed to daily group therapy meetings which are didactic and discussion-based. Some groups are psychoeducational, where clients learn about the disease of addiction. Other groups have to do with building interpersonal techniques and stress tolerance. Another group on emotional regulation and mindfulness reinforces grounding skills. Group topics include grief and loss, denial and defense mechanisms, shame and guilt, and anger management. Clients are also educated about health and nutrition, as well as how to build coping mechanisms for early sobriety.

Fairfax Hospital is usually close to capacity, so the client-to-staff ratio is typically about eight-to-one. Staff members work together as an interdisciplinary team: psychiatrists, nurses, clinical therapists, drug and alcohol counselors, certified therapeutic recreation specialists and a dietician.

Extras

Despite the brevity of the program, family members are encouraged to visit clients and get involved in the recovery process by taking part in family therapy and family support groups, hosted at the hospital on Tuesday nights from 7 pm to 8:30 pm.

Not surprisingly, aftercare planning is part of the program at Fairfax Hospital; before clients leave treatment, they each meet with a discharge planner to look into options for further residential services or outpatient care.

In Summary

A stay at Fairfax Hospital is really for clients who are in crisis and need immediate, acute care and dual diagnosis support. This facility, however, does have the resources to connect its clients with facilities that provide long-term inpatient and outpatient care so that medication can continue to be adjusted and clients can continue developing the skills they will need to navigate their lives clean and sober.

Fairfax Hospital
10200 NE 132nd St
Kirkland, WA 98034

Fairfax Hospital Cost: $450 (7 Days). Reach Fairfax Hospital by phone at (425) 821-2000 or by email. Find Fairfax Hospital on Facebook

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4 Comments

  1. Horrifying facility! My teenage daughter was referred here and came home traumatized. When I visited her, the lobby seemed fine, but the entire place is run by interns! No certified healthcare professional was in sight! The children were placed in a long corridor with towels given to them as blankets and no heating or air conditioning system.There was no space at all. The windows were covered by a thick plastic that did not let any light in. Mold grew behind the bed and around the furniture. The interns neglected and often picked fights with the children. Apparently, their form of therapy is watching movies and forcing children to believe that eating makes everything better as they are forced snack after snack. None of which are actually nutritious. No water is provided to drink in this so-called hospital. Patients are only allowed to drink tea. When handing out medications, the same gloves are used for every child. How disgusting and unsanitary! In addition to this,the children were locked in a place that was too small. It was overflowing with people. Parents weren’t allowed to see their children’s rooms or the inside of the hospital. Visiting hours were short. My daughter daughter cried when she saw me and pleaded to get out as soon as possible. The kids sent here have different and varying reasons of their stay. Some smoked, some drank while others had depression, suicidal thoughts or actions, or like my daughter, anxiety. It is not fair that she was grouped with children who couldn’t even relate to her situation. The hospital is extremely smelly. There is no fresh air. It smells like dirty sweaty socks and powdered cheese swirled into a blender. Imagine inhaling that for the next few weeks. More shocking, a man would come in the middle of the night without any permission at all and would wake up each child to draw blood. How scary! And the doors were locked at night in every room, but were able to be opened by the interns so that they could scavenge the rooms for anything that could potentially harm the child. They took away my daughter’s contact lens case and even her sketchbook – something of which she uses as a coping method for her stress. The backyard of the hospital was the only place where the kids could get a breath of fresh air. It was where all the bags of trash were stored. A twenty foot tall fence surrounded the small area. My daughter says they were almost never allowed to go to the backyard. It was February when she went there and the entire facility was cold. Very cold. They had no heating at all. They had towels for blankets and thick slabs of leather for pillows. If you love your kid and don’t want them to come back suicidal like mine after this traumatizing experience, DO NOT SEND YOUR KID TO FAIRFAX. It is not just almost completely underfunded, but it is also completely horrifying of an experience. Even an individual without mental health issues would become completely insane after spending a night in this place.It is not the other children that make it this way. It is the extremely poor conditions of the facility. If I had the power to, I would do everything I could to immediately shut it down. My daughter returned home worse than I’ve ever seen her and things have not been getting better after that. The woman who ran the place scared the children very much. She spent a few hours everyday at the office and then left early, leaving the entire place run by interns. A suffering child would suffer even more if you send them to Fairfax. Please, as one parent speaking to another, I would strongly, highly advise you to NOT EVER send your child here, even if it is the last resort. This is no hospital. It is a prison. The lobby is the only thing that was updated since the early 2000’s. It has been nearly a year and my daughter still gets nightmares about her experience at Fairfax. Do not ever send your child to this hell.

  2. If I could give this place a negative 100+ stars I totally would because this place is just that horrible!!! I will NEVER take my child back to this place EVER!!! We are filing a complaint with our insurance company, Office of the Insurance Commissioner and the owners of Fairfax Hospitals because of the experience my child had here.

    Check your bill because they’re quick to bill for services that they did NOT render! NOT all their providers / clinical staff is in network with any insurance companies and refuse to be, case in point the psychiatrist on W2.

    The psychiatrist on the ward was less than professional and lacked the knowledge and empathy of a provider who is in charge of taking care of my child’s mental health. My child was left without medical and behavioral health care, medication and treatment information, new prescriptions and coping / managing techniques or anything to help her leave there safer than when she got there and they released her anyways.

    I empower you to seek help with an outpatient provider, talk therapy with a therapist and if you need it psychiatric help with a medication manager and find a support group outside of inpatient. This place was horrible and I am sad to all those that slipped through the cracks because of this place. It’s heartbreaking to see the suicides after being here happen when it could have been helped if this place did their job that the insurance companies are paying them big bucks for.

    Be Well All!

  3. Dawn Padgett on

    I dont even know where to begin with this place. It was truly the worst experience of my and my son’s life. Horrible customer service for me and my son was greeted with “welcome to hell” to begin with.. It’s been 3 weeks and Im still losing sleep over this place. Yolanda should be fired for the way she handles her job.. turning up loud jazz music instead of addressing my questions as a parent. horrible horrible place. Im telling everyone that will listen to me… Dont go here!

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