Austin Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program Review, Cost, Complaints

Austin Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program

1
Share.

Austin Drug and Alcohol Abuse ProgramThe Basics

Opened in 1991 by Dan Davey, a recovering alcoholic looking to share his message of hope with others, Austin Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program is the oldest outpatient addiction treatment center in Austin, Texas. Servicing clients of all ages and economic backgrounds, Austin Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program focuses on two demographics: clients who are new to treatment and those who suffer from chronic relapses. All fees are based on a sliding scale.

Treatment and Staff

Upon arrival, ADAAP clients are given an assessment to determine which course of treatment best suits their needs. Those new to addiction treatment are encouraged to enroll in the Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) which is 12-step based and comprised of 60 hours a week of individual and group therapy. Clients are required to work steps one through five while in treatment, in an effort to help them develop a higher power of their understanding and take their first moral inventory with a sponsor. They are strongly encourage to complete steps six though 12 with sponsors after treatment.

For clients who have been through treatment already, had some sobriety and experienced a relapse, ADAAP’s relapse outpatient program focuses on the basics: the biological, psychological and social aspects of addiction. Clients get help in identifying their triggers, figuring out what went wrong and forming a plan on how to do things differently. They are encouraged to look at social, work and leisure environments to avoid and get further educated on common addiction pitfalls. They will also be guided through confronting self-defeating behaviors by way of personal and spiritual reflection.

The staff at ADAAP is comprised of four LADCs, all of whom are recovering addicts themselves. While the size of the outpatient groups may vary, every group promises to be intimate with plenty of individual attention from the staff. ADAAP does not have a medical doctor or nurse on staff but they do offer outside referrals if needed.

Extras

While many addiction treatment centers employ recovering alcoholics and addicts, ADAAP makes a point of only hiring licensed counselors who have struggled with the disease of addiction and have learned how to stay sober. ADAAP also offers a family program to help clients’ the loved ones learn how they can offer support.

In Summary

For those looking for an intensive outpatient substance abuse treatment program that practices 12-step philosophies and enforces the work behind them, ADAAP is a great fit. Its trained and relatable staff understands the process of recovery beyond what can be learned in a classroom and are specialized in treating chronic relapses. This comprehensive and caring environment at a sliding scale fee makes AADAAP an outpatient program that gets the job done.

The Austin Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program
7801 N. Lamar, Bldg D #109
Austin, TX 78752 

Austin Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program Cost: Sliding scale (30 days). Reach Austin Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program at (512) 454-8180 or by email at [email protected]. Find Austin Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program on Facebook

Do you have a complaint or review of Austin Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program to add? Use the comments area below to add your Austin Drug and Alcohol Program review.

Share.

1 Comment

  1. This facility, I’ve found to be disturbingly bad. I came with almost a year of sobriety–thanks solely to AA.
    Only one counselor seems to have the love and care end effort to be qualified.
    Here’s an example. In AA I met someone who was just trying to get sober, get started with AA and was in his 2nd week at ADAAP. By his third week he asked me to be his sponsor. By his 5th week, he was enjoying AA, but completely resentful of ADAAP. He left AA for a couple months, but stayed sober, and forced himself to complete the 6 week IOP program.
    I understood his resentments fully and clearly since I had the 6 week waste of money and time program.
    We watched movies. The counselor had the same stories and sayings week after week. We received copied handouts which were marked at the bottom with “It is illegal to duplicate this in any way”. After pointing this out, we got the same handouts with the legal warning whited out.
    I’ve been to roughly 450 AA meetings. I went to 18 IOP sessions. The worst AA meeting I’ve ever had insofar as being useless is better than the best IOP session.
    I feel I owe a letter of apology to Blue Cross Blue Shield.
    Also, my probation officer, new on the job, has heard that ADAAP doesn’t provide the best service. Someone I know in the recovery business, who sits on several boards for several organizations has told me she has heard bad things as well.

Leave A Reply

About Author

The largest and most trusted rehab review site in the world.