Asian American Drug Abuse Program Reviews, Cost, Complaints

Asian American Drug Abuse Program

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asianamericandrugabuseprogram.dreamstime_l_3837513The Basics

Since 1972, the Asian American Drug Abuse Program (AADAP) has served the Asian Pacific Islander community of Los Angeles with comprehensive behavioral health and substance abuse treatment programs through long-term residential, outpatient and outreach services for adults and adolescents. AADAP aims to change the stigma of getting help for addiction within Asian communities, and employs a holistic approach to recovery with special consideration for the impact of cultural, environmental and emotional factors of addiction.

Accommodations and Food

AADAP’s co-ed residential facility can accommodate up to 30 clients at a time. At the beginning stages of treatment, residents are placed into a dorm suite that sleeps three in each bedroom, with one shared bathroom. After the first phase of the program which typically lasts 30 days, clients move into semi-private bedrooms shared with only one other resident with a private bathroom for each room. There is a kitchen on-site and staff prepare three meals a day for clients, along with snacks. Food allergies are taken into consideration provided residents enter the program with a note from a physician.

Treatment and Staff

Those who begin treatment in the residential program typically stay for a year to 16 months. Clients have a very structured schedule of treatment which includes both individual and group therapy sessions as well as recreational activities. For the first 30 days, residents are not allowed visitors or phone calls while adjusting to the facility’s daily schedule. After those 30 days are complete, residents can begin to receive visitors and communicate with family. Clients receive weekly urinalysis tests while in the program.

The programs at AADAP are a combination of the 12 steps and therapy based methods. A typical week in the residential track includes art or music therapy, CBT, NA/AA meetings, yoga, anger management, life skills and coping skills groups. Some days there are only two group sessions while others there can be as many as four.

Outpatient clients participate in an Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) that consists of three group therapy sessions per week for about an hour and a half at a time. These groups are designed to provide psychoeducation about the disease of addiction, as well as relapse prevention skills. Additionally, all clients receive one individual therapy session per week for an hour. While clients are in IOP they are expected to attend two to three outside AA/NA meetings a week. The outpatient track lasts between nine and 12 months depending on each individual’s progress. In some cases, clients step down from residential care to IOP.

The staff at AADAP consists of LCSWs, CADCs, LPCs, caseworkers and vocational counselors.

Extras

AADAP provides HIV/AIDS services in addition to court-ordered programs. A family program is available that includes counseling, parenting classes and recreational activities. Treatment programs are available in Korean, Spanish and English.

In Summary

The Asian American Drug Abuse Program takes a person to person approach which is self-evident through its treatment and educational programs. By offering support, education and goal setting strategies, clients come through treatment with a new understanding. AADAP is a particularly great resource for the Asian community in Los Angeles.

Asian American Drug Abuse Program
2900 S. Crenshaw Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90016

Asian American Drug Abuse Program Cost: Sliding scale (residential); $200 (outpatient, 30 days). Reach the Asian American Drug Abuse Program by phone at (323) 293-6284. Find the Asian American Drug Abuse Program on Facebook and Twitter

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